Over 500 million accounts stolen. How to know if you have been hit and how to react

Over 500 million accounts stolen. How to know if you have been hit and how to react
Over 500 million accounts stolen. How to know if you have been hit and how to react
On Saturday, Alon Gal, co-founder of Hudson Rock and a specialist in computer crimes, warned, via Twitter, that more than 533 million Facebook accounts had been hacked, and that the respective data was for sale at insignificant prices in a forum, known for being frequented by individuals linked to online criminal activity.

From marital status to email and phone number, multiple data from multiple people are for sale at low prices. The daily Le Monde, which has been following the issue, offers some answers to five questions that have plagued Internet users, after consulting several experts.

How did hackers get this data?
Facebook explained, in a statement sent to Business Insider, that hackers were able to access this data through a security breach discovered in 2019 and whose accounts created since then no longer have.

It’s the first time?
No. The past few months have been rich in hacking and Facebook has been a major victim. In January, for example, the American press specializing in technology and computers found that a Telegram account was selling, on the digital black market, mobile phone numbers associated with hundreds of millions of Facebook accounts.
The same thing happened again in February and, apparently, the discoveries do not end there.

How do I know if I own one of the 533 million pirated accounts?
It depends on your luck. Traditionally, when a platform is the target of hacking and associated personal data is circulated on the internet, the HaveIBeenPowned website, which controls the main online data breaches, usually provides this information. But the list provided by this domain has only 2.5 million pirated accounts, leaving hundreds of millions out.

How should I protect myself?
If you created a Facebook account before 2018 and associated a mobile phone number, act as if your data had been the target of hacking.
Pay attention to the emails and SMS you receive from entities that may appear to be institutional and asking for confidential information.
If, for example, you receive a message from your bank asking you to click on a link or login that seems suspicious, do not do so and immediately report it to your account manager; if not, contact your bank’s helpline.

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