‘Choro: Winged Marginal’ reveals Charlie Brown Jr. leader behind fame – Culture

‘Choro: Winged Marginal’ reveals Charlie Brown Jr. leader behind fame – Culture
‘Choro: Winged Marginal’ reveals Charlie Brown Jr. leader behind fame – Culture
To compose a portrait of Choro’s career and personality, the director gathered and selected material from 1,200 hours of recorded files
(photo: O2Play / Divulgao)

Understanding what the man was like behind fame was the goal of Felipe Novaes with the documentary “Choro: Winged margin”, his debut in the direction of feature films. The film arrives this Thursday (8/4) to streaming platforms and also to movie theaters, in the Brazilian cities where they are open, which is not the case for Belo Horizonte.

“People deified or demonized Choro a lot. We are very used to seeing Choro in the media, that public persona on the broadcasters, but I was very curious to understand who this person was and how he arrived at that tragic end. I would like to know a little about the routeria and his contradictions. I didn’t need to do a lot of research to understand that he was a very controversial figure ”, commented the director, at a press conference held virtually to promote the film.

Awarded at the 43rd Mostra Internacional de Cinema de So Paulo, in 2019, the documentary seeks to make a multifaceted portrait of the personality of the singer of the band Charlie Brown Jr., who became malice of a generation and died in March 2013, at the age of 42, from an overdose, in a period in which he was going through an intense emotional crisis.

In addition to reconstructing the band’s trajectory and telling backstage stories, the film features testimonies from the remnants of Charlie Brown Jr., Choro’s family and friends, as well as a series of music names, such as Zeca Baleiro, Marcelo Nova, Rick Bonadio and Joo Gordo.


The production gathered and analyzed 1,200 hours of video material, including TV, internet and Choro’s personal archives. Images of the band on the road, dressing rooms and recordings show the singer’s intimacy away from the stage.

The scene of Choro directing a fan with no financial means to buy his records to download his music over the Internet draws attention by revealing his benevolent side, little known to the general public.

“People deified or demonized Choro a lot. We are very used to seeing Choro in the media, that public persona on the broadcasters, but I was very curious to understand who this person was and how he arrived at that tragic end”

Felipe Novaes, director

“There it is possible to condense a lot of things, not only that fascination on the part of the fans, but also to see a very intimate moment, the genuine surrender he had towards the public and its contradictions too”, says the director. “A guy who lived by selling records and copyrights saying to a fan: turn the sound down, you don’t have to worry about spending it. It touches me a lot, because you don’t have to say a lot, just show it. ”

FEELINGS
What Felipe Novaes also tried to show was that Choro managed to be easy and aggressive, talented and reckless, tender and violent. According to reports for the film, a small problem gained much greater proportions for the singer.

“Sometimes, we forget that the idols are normal people like us, with their problems and their issues. Looking at the images and immersing myself in this research, it was clear how much Choro really dealt with these personal issues. The polemics also touched him. So, at times, there was a great difficulty for him to be able to deal with these more difficult feelings that we all have ”, says the director.

The love-hate relationship between Charlie Brown Jr.’s vocalist and bassist Champignon exemplifies this complexity in the film. Champignon (1978-2013) was recruited into the band at age 12 and welcomed by Choro as a son. After the success, the friendship between the two, little by little, became a pit of polemics, with conflicts involving jealousies and internal disputes.

A video by Choro offending and humiliating the bass player in public, during a concert in 2012, of the dimension of how the relationship between the two deteriorated and how much aggressiveness Choro could address to some of his inner circle.

“Choro lived in this rock environment, which is more masculine. We men, especially at that time, were not taught to deal with emotions in the way we talk today”

Felipe Novaes, director

“A guy who has a giant heart, a very good person, but when he is angry with someone, he is very angry. And he is not the kind of guy who forgives,” says Champignon, in a testimony for the documentary, recorded six months ago. after Choro’s death. Seven days after the interview with director Felipe Novaes, the bassist committed suicide in September 2013, leaving his pregnant wife.

“Champignon is the most embarrassing silence that we built and was not in the script”, reveals scriptwriter and executive producer Hugo Prata, director of “Elis” (2016). According to him, the team presented the work to his live before the launch. Thrilled, she thanked the team, saying that the document will be useful to show daughter what happened to her father.

FAME

The production was concerned with not defining someone’s life from an early death, using the episode to discuss other issues. Felipe Novaes believes that the pressure of fame played a crucial role in ending Choro. The documentary shows the cost of success in half-life on the road, far from the family, and the responsibility to manage the band and the support team, with several professionals.

In this context, drug abuse presented as a way to cry out of your daily problems and proposes a reflection on the theme. “A lot of people have the wrong idea that whoever dies like that (from an overdose) is at a party, happy, enjoying life. But hardly ever. We can show people a little bit that that (death) had a meaning, how it all happened, ”says Felipe.

The director attributes the singer’s difficulty in dealing with the immense load of emotions to the context in which he was inserted. “Choro lived in that rock environment, which is more masculine. We men, especially at that time, were not taught to deal with emotions in the way we talk today, ”he points out.

“Life presupposes legal and painful moments. We all feel it, on different scales. I think we are talking about an artist who felt a little more intense. Maybe he didn’t have so many instruments to get over it, except in music ”, he comments.

The documentary explores how, many times, what Choro had to say did not fit only in his lyrics, which even today are successful among different audiences and age groups. In the director’s opinion, the singer’s troubled personality, which defined himself as a “rock boulder”, prevented him from venting some pain.

“Choro was a boy like all of us, who was not taught to deal with feelings like that. And when you mix talent, intensity, media, fame, things sometimes go wrong ”, concludes Felipe Novaes.

“Choro – Winged margin”

Felipe Novaes Documentary. 80 min The film opens this Thursday (8/4) on Now, Google Play, Apple TV, Vivo Play, Looke and Youtube platforms.

* Intern under the supervision of the publisher Silvana Arantes

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