Cape Verde joins the US-managed cybercrime network | NEWS | DW

“It is an informal network created by the G7 and managed by the United States of America, which aims to streamline contacts between States, not replacing, but rather complementing the traditional methods of obtaining assistance in terms of electronic evidence”, explains the Cape Verdean Attorney General’s Office (PGR).

In a statement, announced on Friday (02.04), PGR adds that Cape Verde’s accession to the 24/7 Cybercrime Network was approved on March 26, at the request of that PGR, becoming the 89th member of the group . The organization recalls that Cape Verde is already one of the 65 member states of the Budapest Convention on Cybercrime.

“One more channel”

However, the country now has “another expeditious channel of communication with other States” in “cybercrime matters”, especially with those that are not yet part of the Budapest Convention, “being able, in this way, to request expeditious preservations of data for subsequent MLA (Mutual Legal Assistance) requests “.

The organization also explains that, “similarly to what happens in the other countries that are also members of both Networks”, the functions of contact point for the exchange of information were assumed by the magistrate placed at the Central Department of Cooperation and Comparative Law of the PGR.

A joint statement by the United States and Cape Verde released on Tuesday (30.03), in the context of the partnership dialogue between the two countries that took place on that day, highlighted the fight against cybercrime, through the informal network 24/7, against economic crimes and the continuation of joint patrols in Cape Verdean waters.

Cape Verde, Praia (archive photo).

“Joint operations by maritime security forces will continue to protect Cape Verde’s maritime and territorial integrity and reinforce shared efforts to strengthen security in the Atlantic,” says the joint note released by the Washington State Department.

The statement adds that the two parties have pledged “to assist Cape Verde agencies such as the Judiciary Police to help prevent, investigate and dismantle international criminal networks involved in illicit trafficking and terrorism in the region”.

Future engagements

“Both sides welcomed future engagements between the coast guards of each nation in training, combating illegal, unregistered and unregulated fishing and promoting a rules-based maritime order,” the document also reads.

In the field of security and defense, the parties undertook to “seek an EAW [memorando de entendimento] aimed at deepening common interests “.

“Possibilities for collaboration were also identified by strengthening cybersecurity and supporting Cape Verde’s growth as an ICT platform [tecnologias de informação e comunicação] in West Africa “.

The two countries also highlighted cooperation in terms of security in ports and airports, committing themselves to “identifying other ways to strengthen bilateral cooperation” in these areas, hoping to execute memoranda of understanding on the operationalization of this cooperation in the coming year.

Issues such as the involvement of the Cape Verdean diaspora in trade and investment or climate change were also addressed.

The parties also welcomed the signing of the agreement to implement the FATCA regime, to combat tax evasion.

FATCA is a North American instrument to combat tax evasion, involving dozens of acceding countries, to curb tax havens, money laundering and support for terrorism, providing sanctions for those who do not join.

Failure to adhere to the FATCA implies a penalty of withholding tax of 30% on various income taxed by the United States.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    1. Disable third-party apps

    Games, calendars, petitions – there are many applications from third-party companies that we use on Facebook. Watch out! It was one of these apps that triggered the Cambridge Analytica scandal. So it is best to remove everything that is unreliable and essential. This is done by clicking on the little arrow above to open the “Settings” menu. In the “Apps and sites” section, we can check and delete installed apps.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    2. Define our privacy level

    To define our privacy level, go to the “Settings” menu and the “Privacy settings and tools” section. For example, we can define that only our friends have access to our friends list, our email and our phone. This prevents the capture of this sensitive data by companies posing as “friends of friends” as in the case of Cambridge Analytica.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    3. Control who can use my name

    Without changing the original settings, everyone can identify our name in photos, videos and Facebook posts (the so-called “tagging”). To control publications, go to the “Settings” menu and the “Chronology and identification” section. In “Who can publish in your chronology?” we chose the option “Just me” and, below, we activate the revisions of publications for a greater control.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    4. Delete custom ads

    In “Settings” we can also define the type of advertising we see in the “Ads” section. By restricting the use of our data for ads does not mean that Facebook does not know what our preferences are, as we put likes and shares on the posts that matter. But if the ads are less personalized, it becomes more difficult to develop a detailed profile of our consumption habits.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    5. Do not connect a phone number

    Using Facebook without registering a phone number (only with an email), can prevent the company from connecting the data from the Facebook platform to WhatsApp, the other social network that belongs to the company Facebook. When it bought WhatsApp in 2014, Facebook announced that it would not connect data from the two platforms. But since then it has gradually retreated.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    6. Instagram is also part of

    It is not only WhatsApp that is part of the Facebook group, but also Instagram. Interestingly, one of the most used social networks by people who left Facebook. But unlike WhatsApp, Instagram is already closely linked to Facebook in terms of data exchange. For advertising companies, both platforms are offered as a package by Facebook.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    7. Desinstalar a app do Facebook

    If we want to decrease Facebook’s access to our private data, one of the most important measures is to remove the Facebook app from the phone and start opening the platform through a browser and at www.facebook.com. The app is allowed to record details of phone calls such as the connected numbers or the duration of calls. Using Facebook in the browser prevents this access.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    8. Choose your browser well

    It is also worth choosing your browser well. Whenever we surf the net, we leave a lot of data trails. Through small files on our computer or mobile phone (“cookies”), companies like Facebook are able to identify actions such as online shopping. In 2009, Firefox was the first browser to offer the “Do Not Track” option that reduces online data collection. Other browsers followed.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    9. Respect the privacy of others

    Once a photo or video has been published on Facebook or on another website, it is very difficult to delete. Since they are digital, it is easy to make copies that can remain many years after the original has been deleted. Therefore, it is good to respect the privacy of others and also minors, even if they are our children.

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    10 tips to make your Facebook more secure

    10. Don’t publish what should remain private

    We can consider social networks as a kind of public poster. If we have sensitive data, we should use secure means of communication such as encrypted emails or even the classic telephone. It is always worth remembering that “social networks” are not “private networks” and that companies like Cambridge Analytica can only abuse data that we ourselves have disclosed and shared.

    Author: Johannes Beck

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